Healthy food

5 Simple ways to improve your nutrition without having to break your head

Mim Kleiberg

There is so much information out there on nutrition today and it can all seem very complicated. You can be totally immersed in all of the ins and outs of nutrition and for most of us, we just don’t have the time to count calories, read labels and follow complicated nutrition guidelines. Here’s my 5 simple ways to make eating healthy easy without any brain labour!

  1. Eat as close to nature as possible

Try to eat the food as close to how it occurs in nature as possible. Foods that occur in nature are generally have the healthiest ratio of nutrients for our bodies. For example, fruit contain sugar however, in nature, are always paired with fiber which slows down the sugar’s absorption into the bloodstream. Cutting out processing and additives that can turn a perfectly healthy food into something unhealthy, means that your body can avail of nature’s nutrient profile design. Simply put, potato rather than potato chips, chicken rather than chicken sausage and apples rather than apple juice.

  1. Eat out less

It’s a very easy way to make sure that you’re not eating anything unhealthy. Remember restaurants and takeaways are in the business of selling food. It’s in their interest in making the food taste amazing so that they sell more. This means that this usually takes priority over the health profile of the food. If you prepare your own food as much as possible, you know exactly what’s in your food.

As a side note, these days there is a trend in restaurants with a focus on healthy food, why not make these your go to for take away and eating out once in a while.

  1. Eat vegetables at every meal

Vegetables are a great source of nutrients and fiber. Nutritional guidelines have recently been reviewed and now, 10 a day, rather than 5 a day have been recommended. Now its easy to incorporate vegetables into lunch and dinner with salads and vegetables being part of many staples but breakfast is always a challenge. My answer is green smoothies. Blending vegetables into your morning smoothie is an easy (and tasty) way of having veges for breakfast. Alternatively, adding veges to your eggs are a more traditional way of getting in the nutrients.

  1. Drink more water

Hydration, hydration, hydration. If you’re properly hydrated then you are able to absorb nutrients from your food much better than if you’re dehydrated. Also, dehydration can send false signals to your brain about your hunger levels.

  1. Eat mindfully

Stop and pay attention to what you’re eating. We always seem to multitask while eating. Eating mindfully, paying attention to your satiation, your chewing and the taste of the food means that the process of eating will maximise the absorption of nutrients.

 

Mim Kleiberg is a Star 3 Spinning Instructor, personal trainer and Co-owner of THE ROOM Abu Dhabi with qualifications in Olympic Weight Lifting, Kettle-bells & Functional Training.

Indoor Cycling, Spinning

Body composition and why weight is a bad indicator of your body’s health

Mim Kleiberg

As a trainer and coach the phrase “I want to lose 5/10/15/20kg/pounds” is something I hear all too often. In this day and age we are obsessed with the number on the scales that we see and what changes we can bring to it.

 

But is weight a good measure of our overall body’s health? Everyone has heard the phrase “muscle weighs more than fat” at some stage of their lives and this is absolutely, why weight is a poor indicator of body health.

 

Most people are familiar with the term “body fat,” usually associating it with obesity, heart disease, cholesterol levels and general unhealthiness. Even though our association with the word “fat” is negative, fat is actually essential to life and bodily function. Fat helps in absorption of vitamins, is the base of our hormones and has many other functions in the body.

Now whilst fat is essential to life, too much fat is detrimental to the body. Fat tissue is the body’s storage facility and stores excess energy for use at a later stage. Fat is used as a fuel source in everyday life and during exercise. Excess fat can cause obesity which comes with a whole slew of health problems including like arthritis, heart disease, type 2 diabetes, stroke, some cancers and respiratory problems.

What is a healthy amount of fat?

The amount of fat in your body is referred to by percentage of your body weight. Indicative amounts are specific to gender:

For men:

  • 2 to 5% fat for basic function
  • 6 to 13% fat for athletes
  • 14 to 17% fat for healthy fitness
  • 18 to 24% fat for acceptable wellness
  • 25% or higher is considered obese

For women:

  • 10 to 13% for basic function
  • 14 to 20% for athletes
  • 21 to 24% for fitness
  • 25 to 31% for  acceptable wellness
  • 32% or more is obese

When I train people i aim to decrease their body fat percentage in a number of ways, including changing their nutrition, increasing their cardiovascular exercise quantity and focussing on strength training.

Strength training is a great way to increase your muscle mass. Increasing muscle mass will have a direct effect on your body fat percentage by increasing your body’s requirement of calories (metabolism) to start to use excess fat storage.

 

How do you measure body fat percentage?

 

There are various ways of measuring body fat percentage including calipers, hydrostatic weighing and bio-impedance scales are the popular ways of measuring body fat.

At THE ROOM we use a device that is a bio-impedance scanner to discover your body composition and this device provides a range of data including body-fat percentage, muscle mass, bone density and hydration levels.

If you are a 3 or 12 month member or you have a personal training package with us then you are eligible for a free body composition analysis with one of our trainers and monitoring for the duration of your package or membership.

For further information or questions please don’t hesitate to contact us on info@theroom.ae

 

Mim Kleiberg is a Star 3 Spinning Instructor, personal trainer and Co-owner of THE ROOM Abu Dhabi. She is an avid cyclist and triathlon competitor and is currently training for long distance triathlon.