Health Coach

Health coaching – 6 month program

By Mim Kleiberg

What is a health coach and what will I get from health coaching?

 

Having a health coach is like having a personal trainer for your health and wellbeing. In the same way that a PT customises a program to your specific needs, your health coach will take the time to get to know you, your habits, your current diet, your health and wellness goals, what history you have with previous diets and exercises, and then they will work with you to outline a plan designed to help you reach your goals. Most importantly though, they will hold you accountable to the plan and check on your progress

 

 

A Health Coach is your wellness co-pilot, you and your coach will work together to develop a customized plan that takes your individual physical, emotional and lifestyle factors into account and fits into your life and ultimately leads you to permanent, positive change. They will be your accountability coach. Most of us know what we should be doing and eating to be healthy. A health coach will help you on the path towards health and wellness and help you prioritise and stick to your goals.

 

Health Coaches look at exercise, eating, wellness, and food not just as calories and weight loss, but also on emotional, mental, physical, and spiritual terms. An Integrative Nutrition Health Coach who’s providing services in this area knows about various aspects of his or her clients’ lives like state of mind, health history background, as well as sleep patterns.The ultimate goal of your Health Coach is to improve your quality of life through effective and healthy habits and changes. In order to accomplish this, there must be a strong focus on the overall health of the individual. It could be that the reason previous diets or routines were ineffective was due to emotional or mental stressors. Your Health Coach will dig deep to discover why previous attempts have failed, which will indicate the paths that should work in your individual case.

 

What a health coach can help with:

 

  • Emotional eating
  • Lack of energy
  • Digestive issues
  • Bloating
  • Weight loss
  • Weight gain
  • Frequent colds and flu

 

Mim Kleiberg is a Star 3 Spinning Instructor, Holistic Health Coach, personal trainer and Co-owner of THE ROOM Abu Dhabi with qualifications in Olympic Weight Lifting, Kettle-bells & Functional Training.

Workout couple

Protein – The Tower of Strength

By Louise Du Plessis

 

The importance of protein in athletic performance is a hot debated topic! Should we have more if we exercise more, or do we just keep on eating the same amount? Will it really cause greater muscle mass and a leaner more defined physique?

 

Why do we need protein?

Protein makes up part of the structure of every cell in the body, and is necessary for the growth and formation of new tissues, and also for repairing of damaged tissues.   Proteins are constantly being broken down and re-built in every cell.

 

Does protein provide energy?

Protein does provide some energy, yielding 4kcal/g, which is the same as carbohydrates. However, it’s more difficult for the body to convert protein into energy, than to just use carbohydrates.   When glycogen stores are low, then protein will be used to provide energy but at the cost of other tissues, which over time can lead to loss of lean body mass.

 

How much protein do you need?

The amount required is determined by your size… so the larger you are the greater your protein requirements.  The general recommendation is 0.8g/kg/day for sedentary adults.

 

Protein requirements does increase if you are more active, however varies according to the type of exercise, your body weight, your goals (weight loss or weight gain), your intensity and age.

 

Science recommends:

 

Recreational athletes – 1.1-1.4g/kg

Endurance athletes – 1.2-1.3g/kg

Strength/Power athletes – 1.4-1.7g/kg

 

For example, if you are a female endurance athlete weighing 60kg, then your recommended protein intake is between 72 – 78g/kg/day.

 

The General rule: The more hours you train and the greater the intensity the more protein is required because protein is broken down during exercise.

 

It’s important to note that a high protein diet alone will not lead to any increase in strength or muscle size.  It is only when combined with resistance exercise that additional protein will allow this to happen.

 

When should I eat protein?

Before, during and after exercise, small quantities of protein and carbohydrate should be consumed to speed your recovery.

 

Below are a few commonly consumed foods with their protein content and calories, to give an idea about how much protein we can obtain through dietary intake.

 

We are all individual and have individual needs and requirements, therefore it is important that you know your body and what It needs during certain times of the day, taking into account your activity levels of that particular day.

 

Protein Content of Foods

 

Meat, Poultry and Eggs:

 

Food (Cooked) Serving Size Calories Protein(g)
Chicken, skinless 30g 141 28
Steak 30g 158 26
Turkey, roasted 30g 135 25
Lamb 30g 172 23
Eggs 1 egg 71 6

 

Seafood:

 

Food (cooked) Serving Size  Calories Protein(g)
Salmon 30g 155 22
Tuna 30g 99 22
Shrimp 30g 101 20
Lobster 30g 76 16
Scallops 30g 74 14

 

Legumes, Grains, Vegetables:

 

Food Cooked Serving size (cup) Calories Protein(g)
Pinto Beans ½ 197 11
Adzuki Beans ½ 147 9
Lentils ½ 101 9
Edamame ½ 95 9
Black Beans ½ 114 8
Red Kidney Beans ½ 112 8
Chick Peas ½ 134 7
Black Eyed Peas ½ 100 7
Lima Beans ½ 105 6
Quinoa ½ 111 4
Green Peas ½ 59 4
Spinach ½ 41 3

 

 

Nuts and Seeds:

 

Food Serving Size Calories Protein (g)
Soy Nuts 30g 120 12
Pumpkin Seeds 30g 159 9
Peanuts 30g 166 7
Peanut Butter 1 Tablespoon 188 7
Almonds 30g 163 6
Pistachios 30g 161 6
Flax Seed 30g 140 6
Sunflower Seeds 30g 140 6
Chia Seeds 30g 138 5
Cashews 30g 162 4

 

Dairy Products:

Food Serving Size Calories Protein (g)
Greek Yogurt 180g 100 18
Cottage Cheese 120g 81 14
Regular Yogurt 1 cup 100 11
Skim Milk 1 cup 86 8
Soy Milk 1 cup 132 8
Mozarella 30g 72 7
Strong Cheese 1 small piece 50 6

 

Information reproduced from Today’s Dietitian http://www.todaysdietitian.com and School of Natural Health Sciences – Sports Nutrition

Louise is a nutritional consultant at THE ROOM as well an ultra-distance runner and a cyclist. She has a BSc. in Dietetics, Masters in Nutrition (specializing in adolescent obesity), and a  Postgraduate diploma in Sports nutrition.

 

5 Easy Ways To Eat Right!

Our body is like a machine which needs energy to run the daily course. The food we eat every day is the primary source of energy for our body. To maintain proper functioning we need to fuel our body with all necessary energy elements like proteins, vitamins, carbohydrates, and fibres. Follow these guidelines to make sure that you eat just what your body needs.

 

  1. Cut off refined sugar –

Sugar is toxic to the body and creates a cycle of dependency with highs and lows, eventually draining you of energy. Cutting down sugar helps you retain your energy levels.

  1. Add variety to your diet –

Don’t get stuck in a rut with your diet. Eat seasonally and change it up regularly so that you get a wide range of vitamins and minerals to support your body’s energy levels.

  1. Regulate consumption –

Eat for the activity that you are about to do. If you’re going to work out, eat a balance of good carbohydrates, protein and fat to fuel you for that activity. If you are winding down for the day, eat less as this energy will not be used.

  1. Eat breakfast –

Start your day with a healthy burst of energy. Combine proteins, carbohydrates, and fats to get a right start. Remember, breakfast boosts your metabolism by kick-starting energy consumption for the day.

  1. Drink adequate water –

Water is the basis for the optimum functioning of our body’s system. Making sure you get enough water, as it increases the energy efficiency of your body.

 

Our choice of food is driven by our taste buds and not hunger. The availability of yummy junk food only pushes us towards making more unhealthy choices every day. Avoiding all that tempting food is impossible and too cruel to ask for. However, it is possible to have the best of both worlds. If you need more guidelines you can always get in touch with us. Call us now  on +971 2 4444 945

 

 

Mim Kleiberg is a Star 3 Spinning Instructor, Holistic Health Coach, personal trainer and Co-owner of THE ROOM Abu Dhabi with qualifications in Olympic Weight Lifting, Kettle-bells & Functional Training.

Healthy food

5 Simple ways to improve your nutrition without having to break your head

Mim Kleiberg

There is so much information out there on nutrition today and it can all seem very complicated. You can be totally immersed in all of the ins and outs of nutrition and for most of us, we just don’t have the time to count calories, read labels and follow complicated nutrition guidelines. Here’s my 5 simple ways to make eating healthy easy without any brain labour!

  1. Eat as close to nature as possible

Try to eat the food as close to how it occurs in nature as possible. Foods that occur in nature are generally have the healthiest ratio of nutrients for our bodies. For example, fruit contain sugar however, in nature, are always paired with fiber which slows down the sugar’s absorption into the bloodstream. Cutting out processing and additives that can turn a perfectly healthy food into something unhealthy, means that your body can avail of nature’s nutrient profile design. Simply put, potato rather than potato chips, chicken rather than chicken sausage and apples rather than apple juice.

  1. Eat out less

It’s a very easy way to make sure that you’re not eating anything unhealthy. Remember restaurants and takeaways are in the business of selling food. It’s in their interest in making the food taste amazing so that they sell more. This means that this usually takes priority over the health profile of the food. If you prepare your own food as much as possible, you know exactly what’s in your food.

As a side note, these days there is a trend in restaurants with a focus on healthy food, why not make these your go to for take away and eating out once in a while.

  1. Eat vegetables at every meal

Vegetables are a great source of nutrients and fiber. Nutritional guidelines have recently been reviewed and now, 10 a day, rather than 5 a day have been recommended. Now its easy to incorporate vegetables into lunch and dinner with salads and vegetables being part of many staples but breakfast is always a challenge. My answer is green smoothies. Blending vegetables into your morning smoothie is an easy (and tasty) way of having veges for breakfast. Alternatively, adding veges to your eggs are a more traditional way of getting in the nutrients.

  1. Drink more water

Hydration, hydration, hydration. If you’re properly hydrated then you are able to absorb nutrients from your food much better than if you’re dehydrated. Also, dehydration can send false signals to your brain about your hunger levels.

  1. Eat mindfully

Stop and pay attention to what you’re eating. We always seem to multitask while eating. Eating mindfully, paying attention to your satiation, your chewing and the taste of the food means that the process of eating will maximise the absorption of nutrients.

 

Mim Kleiberg is a Star 3 Spinning Instructor, personal trainer and Co-owner of THE ROOM Abu Dhabi with qualifications in Olympic Weight Lifting, Kettle-bells & Functional Training.